The Impact of ABA Therapy for Children with Autism

Archive for the ‘Autism’ Category

The Impact of ABA Therapy for Children with Autism

Posted on: January 3rd, 2019 by rebecca blackwell

 

What is ABA Therapy and how can it help children on the spectrum?

The Impact of ABA Therapy for Children with Autism

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a spectrum of complex neurobiological disorders with common symptoms that are most often characterized by difficulty communicating and relating socially to others, and an obsessive need to engage in repetitive behaviors or language. Symptoms of ASD show up in infancy and very early childhood and might include avoiding eye contact, delayed speech or not speaking at all, not responding to his or her name, and restricted interests.

 

It’s important to understand that there are a wide variety of symptoms for children who fall somewhere on the spectrum. Symptoms that are easy to spot in one child might be virtually invisible in another.

 

However, every child who lands somewhere on the spectrum struggles with challenges in these three areas: 

 

• Verbal and non-verbal communication.
• Relating to and understanding other people and the world around them
• Adapting to change or dealing with unpredictability.

 

The goal of any treatment option is to maximize the child’s ability to function by reducing ASD symptoms in a way that also supports positive development and learning. However, the range of home-based, school, and clinical treatment options can be completely overwhelming. Parents of children with autism want what all parents want – to provide their child with the support and resources they need to lead a happy, meaningful life.

 

We believe that Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is one of the most effective ways to support families by helping children with autism acquire new, positive behavior and communication skills while decreasing behavior that is destructive and detrimental to their development. 

 

What is ABA Therapy?

 

In a nutshell, Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is a systematic approach to treating the symptoms of autism while increasing communication and decreasing maladaptive behaviors. The approach starts with the understanding that not being able to communicate is incredibly frustrating for children with autism, and this frustration can cause them to act out in destructive ways.

 

ABA therapy has been proven to improve a child’s ability to communicate and teach behavior that helps them form vital social relationships. The approach is also an effective way to teach play and self-care skills that support long-term healthy development. Children who receive consistent treatment, especially from a young age, generally show significant improvements in school performance and their ability to act appropriately in a wide variety of social situations.

 

The Impact of ABA Therapy for Children with Autism

 

Hundreds of studies have demonstrated that ABA therapy can improve communication, social relationships, play skills, and self-care for children with autism. The techniques have been shown to help children perform better in school and may even prepare some children for future employment. Early intervention is most effective, but even when applied to adults, research confirms that ABA is a powerful method for reducing undesirable behaviors and increasing positive social interaction.

 

Perhaps most important, many parents of children receiving Applied Behavior Analysis report a significant reduction in daily stress. Parent involvement is incredibly important to the healthy development of all children – but, being the parent of a child with autism is not easy. ABA therapy can offer parents significant relief from the stress of caring for a child on the spectrum by offering the skills to help them communicate more effectively with their child.

 

It’s hard to underestimate the impact this can have on the overall health of a family. So, let’s dig deeper into why ABA therapy is so effective.

 

Behavior Analysis: Let’s start from the start.

 

Behavior analysis is simply a way to understand a child’s behavior by observing them in a variety of situations. No child operates in a vacuum. So, behavior analysis seeks to understand how environmental influencers affect behavior. The approach is founded on the premise that we can learn a lot about what’s happening inside a child by investigating what the child does – their actions, words, and skills. And, in seeking to understand why a child behaves the way they do, we must also examine the physical and social influencers that might change or be changed by that behavior.

 

Behavior analysis is also an excellent way to help explain how learning takes place for children with autism. Learning is a complicated and intricate process with countless variables. Through understanding the many intricacies of how learning takes place, we can develop principles and techniques for increasing positive behavior and reducing harmful and destructive behavior.

 

Applied Behavior Analysis is simply the application of what’s learned from Behavior Analysis.

 

ABA is a systematic approach to treating the symptoms of autism while increasing communication.

 

It’s all well and good to understand why a child is behaving in a certain way, but Applied Behavior Analysis takes that information and uses it in practical ways to help children acquire important life skills. Starting with specific knowledge about how the child is having trouble getting their needs met, ABA therapy implements practical skills that teach them how to make healthy self-care choices, work well with others, and pursue personal interests. As the child learns more effective ways to communicate with the outside world, destructive behaviors are no longer necessary and naturally decrease.

 

“One of the most effective ways to understand ABA therapy is to compare behavior to a pendulum. Communication skills are on one side of the pendulum and maladaptive behavior born out of total frustration are on the other side. By helping a child communicate in a way that puts them in control of getting their needs met, the pendulum swings away from the difficult behavior. It’s not easy, and takes time, but ABA therapy is one of the most effective methods we have to support the health and happiness of children with autism and their families.”
– Crystal Ciszek, Director of Operations and Business Development, The Autism Therapy Group

 

What Does ABA Therapy Involve?

 

ABA is one of the most effective treatments for autism in part because of how easy its principles can be applied in both structured environments, such as a classroom, and in day-to-day life, such as trips to the grocery store, play dates with neighborhood friends, or getting along with siblings.

 

ABA programs are highly structured, providing children with the consistency and repetition they need to test and modify their behavior. Therapists create a plan for the development of specific skills that is specific to each child’s needs. Skills are broken down into specific steps so that progress can be clearly tracked and the treatment plan can be adjusted if necessary.

 

The Impact of ABA Therapy for Children with Autism
 

One of the most effective parts of ABA treatment is the opportunity for repetition. Repetition is necessary for learning, so children are given ample opportunities to practice skills in a variety of situations. When the child achieves the desired results from an action, they are immediately given positive reinforcement which serves as further motivation to repeat the behavior.

 

Our approach at ATG is focused primarily on in-home therapy and other environments in which the family is consistently present, such as houses of worship, community events, extended family involvement, and athletic or cultural performance events.

 

Most ABA programs include support for the child at school and facilitated play with other children. As such, the therapy is tremendously effective in nurturing the development of basic life and social skills. Children learn to look at people who are speaking to them, notice things in their environment, understand social cues, and listen to people who are speaking to them. ABA therapy is also effective at helping children develop complex cognitive skills such as reading, holding a conversation, and even understanding other people’s perspectives.

 

ABA treatment is not a one-size-fits-all textbook like approach to the treatment of autism. There is no instruction sheet to follow or checklist to mark. On the contrary, one of the things that makes it so effective is that the intervention is customized to each child’s abilities, interests, situation, and needs. An ABA program for one child will look different than a program for another.

 

Progress builds on progress.

 

It’s important to understand that ABA therapy is an integrative, long-term approach, and the rate of progress varies from child to child. However, in most cases, small noticeable improvements will be apparent soon after therapy begins. As children recognize the personal benefits of behavioral changes, their progress becomes a natural stepping stone for further improvement.

 

ABA programs, including the programs offered through The Autism Therapy Group, create room for children to learn new skills and then put them into practice in both structured and unstructured situations.

 

Perhaps the most vital element in the effectiveness of ABA treatment is the treatment team. At ATG, we take a team approach to treatment, which may include a Client Case Manager, a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) who manages and assesses your child’s progress, and additional specialized therapists brought in to meet specific needs. This team approach ensures that families are supported throughout the entire treatment process.

 

If you have a child with autism and are wondering if ABA therapy might be a useful component to their development, please contact us. We welcome all your questions, comments, and suggestions.
For more information and resources related to autism, please visit the ATG Resource Page.

 

Autism-Friendly Eating Out Tips

Posted on: December 7th, 2016 by Autism Therapy Group

 
eating-out
 
Eating out should always be an escape, an enjoyable, relaxing experience, but when you’re going out to eat with your kids, things don’t always go as planned. If your family has a member on the autism spectrum, these challenges may keep you at home, feeling too overwhelmed to take on the whole endeavor.

 

But it doesn’t have to be that way, and every family deserves to enjoy a nice outing where you share laughs over delicious food (that you don’t have to cook or clean – bonus!).  Here are some tips you can try to embrace going out to eat with the whole family.

 

  1. Prepare before your outing:
  2.  

  3. food-plate

 
Those with autism thrive on schedules and predictability, so springing a restaurant trip out of the blue may be a trigger for your child. Instead, plan and prepare ahead of time by talking about the plans, going over questions and answers such as:

 

  • Where are you going and why?
  • When are you going there? What day, what time, how much longer?
  • Who is going with you?
  • Has your child been to this restaurant before?
  • Will there be a waiting period? If so, where will you wait and how long will that be? What activities can you do while you’re waiting? Are reservations available?
  • Review the menu online with your child – what foods sound good to them?
  • Is there a special event you’re celebrating?

 

  1. Role play:
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  3. tables

 
There are several YouTube videos specifically for children and children with autism role playing different situations like going out to eat. You can watch these videos with your child and practice role playing with your family at home.

 

Simulate the restaurant experience, including the following: walking in the doors, checking in with the host, waiting, choosing seats, meeting the server, being given a menu, looking at choices and making up your mind, ordering and speaking to the server (or asking mom or dad to help), talking with the guests, etc.

 

You can also read books or point out on TV shows when families are eating out, talking about their behavior and steps in the whole process.

 

  1. Create a visual schedule:
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  3. schedule

 
To coincide with your planning and preparing ahead phase, you can also create a visual schedule that will remind your child in an easy way the steps in going out to eat. Create the visual supports with your child so he or she is involved in the experience from start to finish. Some steps to consider including:

 

  • Driving or other transportation to the restaurant
  • Who will be there with your group
  • Waiting to be seated
  • Who else will be there at the restaurant (other guests, hostess, servers)
  • Menu and ordering food
  • Communicating with family while waiting for food
  • Table manners
  • Paying and leaving the restaurant

 
You can make this by hand or use an online visual tool kit or organizer to create something on the computer.
 
With proper planning and practicing, your family can enjoy a nice trip out to a restaurant. Don’t let fear get in the way – the more you try, the more you will learn, and if an obstacle arises, don’t let it throw you off track. Use it as a learning experience for how you can modify your plan and trip for the next time around.

 

How do you prepare for restaurant outings with your family?

Enjoying the Holiday Season with Your Special Needs Child

Posted on: December 7th, 2016 by Autism Therapy Group

 
holiday-blog
 
The holidays are often a stressful time for adults, filled with party engagements, shopping, spending, cooking, cleaning, and lots of preparations. As the parent of a child with special needs, sometimes the holidays can bring an extra stress, with movies, television, and commercials showing supposed “normal” families smiling and laughing through their holiday traditions.

 

But what if your family looks and feels different? What if your family doesn’t fit that cookie cutter mold (and whose does, actually?). You might feel sad that your family doesn’t match those picture perfect ones on TV; then you might feel guilty that you feel this way and ultimately you may feel alone, like you’re the only one feeling this way.

 

Shouldn’t the season be filled with love, peace, joy, and enjoying simple family moments? You don’t have to just survive this season – you deserve to embrace it! Check out these 3 tips to maximize the special time with your special needs child and your family in general.

 

  1. Lose the guilt:
  2.  

  3. How can you say yes to a cocktail party and leave your special needs child at home? How can you have a carefree night out filled with laughter when you have far more serious, pressing issues on your plate? Just because you’re the parent of a child with special needs does not mean you don’t get to enjoy time away from home.

 
wine-dinner
 
When you take time to take care of yourself, you’ll actually be a better spouse, friend, and of course, parent. So say ‘yes’ – having time away from home with your family and friends and allowing yourself to let loose a bit will help you emotionally, mentally, and physically, giving you the recharge you need to be the best parent you can to your children.

 

  1. Take on what you can:
  2.  

  3. At the same time, you don’t have to say yes to every invitation and engagement; spreading yourself too thin or putting yourself in social situations that you’re uncomfortable with never end well. Don’t worry about what your family or friends will think about you saying no – ultimately you have to decide what is best for you and your family.
  4.  

family-red
 
Think about activities, events, and locations that will make you and your child feel happy – isn’t that what it’s all about? Surround yourself with supportive people who will add to your experience and make your child feel comfortable. Don’t use your child as an excuse to shut yourself away or to isolate yourself, but find a happy balance of fun, engaging activities, even a small get together at home, and pushing yourself to try new, safe activities to get out in public.

 

  1. You’re not alone:
  2.  

  3. You may feel like the only family who is different, but guess what? You are not alone. In fact, there are other families in your very own community who are feeling the same way, so why not reach out to those who will understand you most?
  4.  

The holidays are a trying time for anyone, with financial burdens causing stress and having a general feeling of being spread too thin. You’re not alone. Connect with others online or through community groups to bridge the isolated gap, have your feelings validated, and unite with like-minded people.

 

There’s plenty of time to take back the holiday season, and not only ‘get through’ it, but to truly embrace it, as an individual and for your whole family.  How do you welcome the holiday season? How do you manage difficult, stressful times?

Practicing Social Skills with Your Child

Posted on: November 14th, 2016 by Autism Therapy Group

social-skills

Understanding social cues and having appropriate social skills is incredibly important yet challenging for those with special needs. Just like with any skill, practice makes perfect – check our list of activities you can practice with your child to enhance his or her awareness of social cues and allow your child to run through these actions in a safe and supportive environment.

Not only will practicing these skills be a bonding experience with your child, but it will show him or her that you care while boosting confidence.
 
Interpreting emotions
 

No matter where your child goes – home, school, the cafeteria, playground, soccer field, or out at the mall – it’s imperative to be able to pick up on emotions and understand them correctly. By understanding emotional faces and body language, your child will be able to appropriately respond to various social situations.
 

Imitation:
 
A simple way to work on emotions if to make a face or show body language associated with a certain feeling; then have your child imitate you. You can start off with something silly and goofy to keep the mood light and fun.

imitation
 

Understanding idioms
 

Picking up on idioms can be challenging for children, and for those on the autism spectrum, idioms are downright confusing. To help your child understand the difference between a literal statement and an idiom and to understand what those idioms mean, try some activities with them.

 

  • Books:
  •  

  • Take a trip your library and check out books on idioms. Try this list for a great, fun way to teach idioms from The Best Children’s Book site.
  • books

 

Eye contact
 

Establishing solid eye contact creates interest in conversation and shows confidence. Try these activities to practice strong and appropriate eye contact.
 

  • Sticker on the forehead:
  •  

  • This idea comes from Children Succeed. Put a sticker in the middle of your forehead (you can use a sticker of eyes if you want!) and encourage your child to look at the sticker during conversation. Many people find direct eye contact intimidating, so this is a great stepping stone to train them to look in the right direction in a less threatening way.
  • eye-contact

 

  • Staring contest:
     

    When practicing social skills, why not make a game or contest out of it? Have a friendly staring contest with your child, or if he or she is competitive, it could turn into a serious competition! Let the games begin.

How do you practice social skills with your child? What activities or strategies work for you?

Autism Resources for Teachers

Posted on: November 14th, 2016 by Autism Therapy Group

teachers

When it comes to school, students are often with their teachers for more time than they are with their parents.  For parents of children with autism, their teachers’ understanding of autism, how to reach and challenge their child, and how to meet their child’s emotional and social needs are especially important.

Use these resources complied by the National Education Association to stay comprised on all things autism, from general information and instructional methods to helpful techniques and activities and materials, this will be your ultimate go-to list for helpful information.
 
AUTISM INFORMATION
 

 

INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS AND HELPFUL TECHNIQUES
 

 

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS
 

 

© Created especially by ASA for use by the NEA and its members. Resources are listed in accordance with ASA’s Options Policy.

As a teacher, how do you meet the needs of your autistic students? What training, development, or resources do you find helpful?

Autism Apps for Kids

Posted on: October 20th, 2016 by Autism Therapy Group

app

We live in an increasing age of technology; from integration in schools, at home, and in the workplace, technology is no longer just a source of mindless games and entertainment. In fact, there are several proven apps that help support the needs of children with autism.
 
Benefits of apps:
 

  • Relevant learning tool
  • Increases social development
  • Practice and master skills
  • Provides useful visual support
  • Useful tools to increase and practice communication

Check out these expert-recommended apps for the iPhone and iPads to find what works for your child.
 

  • iPrompts:
  •  

  • “iPrompts® includes several easy-to-use, visual prompting templates to help individuals transition from one activity to the next, understand upcoming events, make choices, and focus on the task at hand.

 

  • No need to spend hours creating image cards by printing, cutting and laminating
  • No bulky or stigmatizing binders or strips of images
  • Store thousands of images in your pocket
  • Add your own pictures to the hundreds of stock images included within iPrompts®
  • Electronically backlit images are bright and visible any time of day or night
  • Paperless and environmentally friendly.”
  •  

  • iprompt

 

  1. Pictello:
  2.  

  3. “An easy way to create, playback and share visual stories and talking books.” Users will develop reading, writing, and spelling skills while building confidence in communication.

 

pictello
 
Features:

 

Use the wizard function to create stories of your own

  • Play a slideshow of your creation
  • Integrate multimedia by adding your own photos and video clips
  • Share your stories with other users

 

  1. Cognoa:
  2.  

  3. “Cognoa is a consumer healthcare company that’s changing how parents assess and support their child’s development. Already one of the largest screeners of children’s development, Cognoa gives parents peace of mind by identifying where a child is on track and what parents can do to help the child improve.”
  4.  

  5. cognoa
  6.  

  7. First Then Visual Schedule:
  8.  

  9. “First-Then visual schedule is an affordable user-friendly mobile application designed for caregivers to provide positive behavior support through the use of visual schedules. First-Then was designed for individuals with communication needs, developmental delays, autism spectrum disorders or anyone who would benefit from a structured environment.”
  10.  

  11. first-sched
  12.  

  1. Learn with Rufus:
  2.  

  3. Your child will learn to sort his or her feelings and emotions with this interactive app. Watch as they have fun while learning how facial expressions tell us what someone is feeling and how to identify and express those emotions. This customizable game will meet the needs of your child’s development and learning styles.
  4.  

  5. rufus
  6.  

As you already know, technology, phones, and iPads can be excellent sources of learning, development, and information but can also become a somewhat addictive habit. Be sure to monitor computer time and create clear time limits and rules your child understands. Reinforce these apps with breaks and other methods of learning that do not utilize technology to create a balance. Encourage your child to bring these skills to the outside world and to practice them in real social settings to see how these apps can pay off in real life.

 

What apps do you use? Have you created rules for using technology? Share your tips, apps, rules, and experiences below.

Autism Coping Skills for Parents

Posted on: October 14th, 2016 by Autism Therapy Group

a1

As a parent of a child with autism, only you can understand the unique dynamics, obstacles, joys, and struggles that occur on a daily and nightly basis, but don’t worry, even though it may feel like it at times, you are not alone. Thousands of other families are handling similar situations, and the great news? There are coping skills you can use during those trying moments.
 

  1. Avoid the internet:
     
     
    What’s the first thing people turn to in times of need, desperation, or questioning? The internet, of course. It’s an endless resource, literally available at your very fingertips any time of the night or day.
  2.  

 
Put your phone down. Turn the computer off. Stay off the internet.
 
 
What may start as good intention will turn into an endless black hole of “information,” leading you in hundreds of different directions, often spiraling out of control. What you need in your times of need is calm. What you need is security. The internet can be a wonderful resource but can also be your worst enemy.

When you feel the need to Google your dilemma, write it down in a journal, call a friend, turn to a book, and wait to call your doctor.
 
 

  1. Network:
     
     
    While you should trust your doctor and therapists for medical advice, sometimes the best and most comforting support you will receive is from other parents who have been there. This is where the internet can actually be a useful tool – use it to network with parents of children with autism and start building relationships.
  2.  

Remember, you may feel alone, but you are not alone. Connecting with other families will assure you of this, and you can lean on one another for support, share your triumphs, and offer to listen through those bad days.

A word of caution and advice? While online groups, including social media networks, can be an excellent source of support, you should be prepared to brush off unsolicited advice. Weed through any negativity and focus on those positive relationships.
 
 

  1. Give yourself grace:
     
     
    Through the good and challenging days, doctor office waiting rooms, and waiting for school meetings, your responsibilities go on and on. Don’t forget to give yourself allowances for you Taking care of yourself is not selfish; in fact, you will be the best help to your child if you first take care of yourself. Get into a habit of making “me time” every day, even as little as 20 minutes; whether it’s reading before bed, getting in a quick workout, or finding a peaceful moment to reflect and journal, find what makes you happy and make sure to remember your needs.
  2.  
     

  1. Not every day is a win:
     
     
    Finding what works for your child is an ongoing process; you will inevitably try things that work and run into strategies that do not work, and that’s okay. Not every day needs to a win to be considered a success. Focus on the positives, no matter how small, and learn from the trials. There are treatments and therapies that will work for your child; you may have to go through various methods before you find the right one, but it is out there.
  2.  
     

  1. Ask for help:
     
     
    Parents have a notion that they need to take on the world, especially parents of children with special needs. But guess what – you’re human! If you’re having a hard day, you don’t have to just grin in bear it. If you need to cry and talk about it to a spouse or friend, do it – don’t hold the weight in and keep it all to yourself.

Remember: you will best be able to care for your child if you take care of yourself first. This means asking for help – doctors, partners, friends, neighbors, your child’s school – they are all part of your support system, so ask for help before you feel completely and utterly overwhelmed.

What coping strategies have worked for you? Are you a member of any online support groups or social network sites for parents of children with autism? Are you guilty of becoming a doctor of Google? Share your experiences so we can cultivate a community.